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Scott Schopieray

Credit on "lower p" academic work

2 min read

Recently I went down a deep rabbit hole looking at contribution, acknowledgment, and authorship models for academic work. All of the work I found (sample resources at bottom) focused on traditional scholarship, but I’m trying to imagine how do you bring some of those notions to work in the more informal publishing ("publishing with a lowercase p") we do with our daily work as learning designers, administrators and those working on sharing knowledge within our institution. 

A big question to wrestle with in this area is “what is enough” in terms of giving credit. There are times when people get left out accidentally, then there are times where you are trying not to overburden the person by inviting them to write even though you know that they have contributed to something, and other times where the person may have contributed to ideation or otherwise to the though without knowing (e.g. through conversation or having inspired a thought). 
 
So then, how do you credit them in a way that gives that credit or acknowledgment of their contribution to something, but which doesn’t indicate authorship? How do you do it in a way that they know about? For example, I could credit a colleague for something that they've influenced me on but never say anything to them about it, and then if a third-party asked them about the credit I gave and they wouldn't know about it.
 
From reading through work on the topic, this boils down to three main "classifications" of credit - authorship, contributorship, and acknowledgment. What are these three and how do we (your community of practice) define them, practice them, and ensure others are sharing the same understanding? 
 
 

Scott Schopieray

Designing Workshops to be MultiModal

3 min read

As we continue through this transformational period of teaching and learning I find myself thinking more and more about how teaching with and across multiple modalities is becoming increasingly important. We have opportunities to transcend space and time, to use multiple modes of content delivery and ways of engaging learners. This is no less important in faculty development work, where our learners are our colleagues who are all leading just as busy and hectic lives as we are.
 
Workshops and tipsheets have long been the backbone of faculty development work and they work well in different scenarios. Workshop attendance on campuses is often sporadic and it can be difficult to anticipate properly the interest level in the work by those who may want to learn more but couldn't/didn't attend. Tipsheets can be extremely helpful but with the regular updates that happen to most educational technologies these days they can often go out of date and become ineffective or irrelevant. Effectiveness has often been measured by attendance or "hits" on a tipsheet page, not by long-term engagement or change in practice.
 
At the heart of what we are doing is a desire to create effective faculty development opportunities that are accessible, and most importantly, used by our colleagues. How do we move from a focus on attendance and headcounts to these more long-term changes in practice and engagement?
 
Designing Workshops to be Multimodal
 
What if we were to design our workshops to be multimodal by nature? What if, by design, the workshops could be just as easily offered synchronously face-to-face as they could asynchronously online? And how would we do this in a way that isn't resource intensive on the part of the workshop leader or other staff?  
 
For the first pass we may think about identifying the natural stopping points in the workshop video as cut points, and then introducing some sort of active opportunity in that spot would be good.
 
potential current model:
5 min intro video
reflect on your goals for attending
10 min intro a topic
do a worksheet or discuss with a partner, etc.
Video
Worksheet
etc.
 
then maybe some linked resources or next step suggestions at the end... perhaps a link to a learning community, mailing list or other sort of campus-level thing that could be of interest
 
 A longer-term goal would bbe figuring out how to encourage faculty to take more of a multimodal approach to planning their workshops... e.g. planning for the asynchronous audience as they plan the synchronous session

Scott Schopieray

AWS Back end storage for Omeka S

1 min read

There is a really great module that was developed by Jared Howland at BYU that allows for Omeka-S users to use cloud services as a back-end for their Omeka sites. This module makes it easy to use something such as an AWS bucket for storage of large media objects that are being uploaded to Omeka.

We have found this useful for some work in DH that faculty are doing with archival quality scans of comic books or photographs. These are projects that would normally eat up allocated space on a web server fairly quickly. In something like our instance of Domain of One's Own, a shared webhosting platform, our faculty are only given 1GB of space by default. In a project like these above we would find the allocated space being consumed within about 5-6 uploads. This module allows us (for a reasonable price using our campus contract) to use AWS as the back end for these projects. We don't have to provision an additional space for them, they can use their own domain space for it without using up all of their space. 

Tutorial is in development at:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Hjbq8FV1ccbmAM8oDmAkkF5MdTZHgtSdDrdcbeY7i20

Scott Schopieray

Fixing Omeka and Wordpress in the same directory issue

2 min read

 
This is an excerpt from a conversation trying to fix a student project where there was a wordpress site in the home directory and someone installed Omeka over top of it, then when Wordpress auto updated it overwrote the index.php file and rendered the Omeka site useless.
 
The trick is once we know that is fully correct you can blow away everything in the main directory, and clone the bk.hussa100 back over to the main directory. There is another omeka install in there that is called omekadelete that can be deleted as well
 
So the fix (which I'm going to document in my known site) is that I cloned the Omeka instance off to a subdomain, but when I did that it took the files that were changed by wordpress yesterday... The key file that was screwing everything up will not be surprising, it was index.php. So I installed a new version of Omeka and copied the index.php file from there over to the bk.hussa100 site. 
 
Moral of the story... we now know that when you install wordpress over Omeka in a directory, that the index.php file appears to be the only one that is overwritten by WP. Because the Omeka Classic index.php is not different from one Omeka instance to another any copy of an Omeka Classic index.php would work (so in theory I could have grabbed it from their github as well)

Scott Schopieray

Scaffolded Model for Technologically Enhanced Reflective Work

1 min read

Several colleagues and I (Sandra Logan, Daniel Trego, Madeline Shellgren, Jessica Knott) have been working on a model for scaffolding technologically enhanced reflective work with the Citizen Scholars program in the College of Arts and Letters. This model was implemented starting in September 2019 and is working toward stage 4 by the end of spring 2020.

http://files.schopie1.com/CS_Tech_Scaffolding_small.key

Scott Schopieray

Scott Schopieray

Workflow for voice annotating an image with Keynote and uploading to Digication

1 min read

Our Citizen Scholars program is using digication 

 

 

Scott Schopieray

Researcher tech toolkit -- using a team drive provided with an MS Teams site creation

2 min read

When the team and accompanying OneDrive space is  available.
 
The team is available like normal through Teams and the drive is available two ways...
  1. You can access it within Teams by navigating to the team and clicking the "Files" tab on the top. From here you can upload and download files that will be available to anyone in the team. You also can click on "Open in Sharepoint" and you'll get to the file space for the drive. Here you can better set permissions and/or use the "Sync" feature to create a desktop folder that will sync with the cloud drive. Note: working within this space assumes that everyone working on the committee is using Teams. If they are not you'll definitely want to use the space below. 

  2. Alternatively, you can go to http://spartan365.msu.edu and log in with your netid and password. From here you'll want to go to OneDrive and then on the left side under Libraries you'll either see it listed or you might need to click More Libraries in order to see it. When you click on it you'll be taken to the file space for it where you can upload things and modify permissions. This is the space where you can create files that are sharable with the group but which are not necessarily available in the MS Teams site. 

Scott Schopieray

CNAME changes in reclaim are done with the zone editor that is in the area where subdomains/etc. are. Can also be done from the WHM interface if needed, might be faster that way if one knows what they are doing.

Scott Schopieray

Draft 1 of tipsheet for installing Open Journal Systems (OJS) on Reclaim Hosting is available at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rWefadpf9CI7DkFZKVS8xcYSuyrp2OruwCVNVemzkgM/edit?usp=sharing