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Scott Schopieray

Questions for CPIL App - Draft 0.0.1

1 min read

 

Reflective Component

These are the questions to be considered as one reflects back on the prior year of work.

  • What are the things that you set out to do last year?
  • Did you accomplish these things that you said you would accomplish?
  • If not what prevented you from accomplishing them?
  • Are there things you accomplished this year that are not in your list of things you set out to do?

 

Critical Planning

  • What are three things you plan to accomplish in the coming year?
  • When will you know that you have accomplished them?
  • How do you plan to reflect throughout the year to understand your progress toward them?
  • What will you do on a daily basis to ensure that you were moving toward those goals?

Context-Making

  • How do these future accomplishments fit into the way you want to move your career forward over the longer term?
  • How are these things related to both shorter-term and longer-term goals?
  • How are you going to work with your supervisor, mentor, team, etc. to move toward these goals?

Scott Schopieray

Education 2035 Core Values DRAFT Statement

2 min read

** Note: This text was largely written by Sonja Fritzsche and Andrew Christlieb based off of conversations at a series of conversations during Fall 2018 with faculty from around the institution who have an interest in thinking about the values we must embody as we consider the technical futures of education.

The MSU Education 2035 initiative holds that technology and AI-enhanced learning must be adopted primarily for education improvement and not as a dollar-saving opportunity. When done well these are not inexpensive tools.

During fall 2018, we met three times to discuss a core values statement. The various participants found the following four values and subcategories/questions to be the guiding principles for successful technology adoption on campus in the area of teaching and learning. Only in this way will we be able to think critically around solving real problems today and into the future, rather than just streamlining and improving teaching. All activity of the Education 2035 initiative embodies these values.

Community – conversation, collaboration, shared decision making from community teams/brains that include faculty, students, staff, and administrators.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – diversity of users reflected in the diversity of work groups, open source/open access, algorithmic literary, digital literacy, continual recognition of and measures taken to combat implicit data bias that reinforce existing cultural power structures

Transparency – student and faculty data usage ethics, data privacy rights, a culture of data usage consent, data implicit bias, decision making and policies, transparency of data, algorithm, process

  • Data collection (D2L issues?): what gets collected and how long is it stored?
  • Data ownership: who owns it?
  • Data control: who gets control? How can students edit/adjudicate?
  • Data access: who sees what, how is the data displayed, how do I ask for it?
  • What happens when the company is sold?
  • Data use (D2L): how does D2L use the data, how does MSU use the data, how to instructors use the data, how is any of this communicated to the students?
  • Data communication: how is data shown?

Accountability – equity audit process, development of a university code of ethics for data ownership, data ethics MSU data privacy statement and syllabus information, assessment of compliance with first three values (Community, DEI, and Transparency), tools must solve real pedagogical problems, not just innovate for innovation’s sake.

 

Scott Schopieray

iOS Design Lab At MSU

3 min read

ioslabThe iOS design lab is a project that we started Michigan State University to help our students gain valuable skills that they need to be successful in 21st-century work. The first year is a two-semester program, with an option for a summer internship to continue working on a project.

 

We start students out doing work in groups and teams that are arranged by connecting their interests and passions. The first several weeks of the semester the individual students look at what they are interested in, areas they want to work in or topics they want to focus on. They form teams and the teams engage in a lot of design thinking, brainstorming, and conversation over the course of the semester to design the idea for an application that they will develop. By the end of the first semester, the teams have thought about their ideas, developed some strategies for dealing with the ethical, moral, safety, cultural, etc. components of their applications and are preparing to think about how they will handle more of the technical components as they move forward.

 

During the second semester, they focus largely on the technical portions of app development. They develop a familiarity with the Xcode, create small apps that allow a sense of accomplishment and which develop skills with Swift, and 

 

software, and developing a level of competency with thinking computationally and learning to use different components of the programming language to accomplish their goals. We work over the semester to get them into some state where they are able to both develop things for the app, think confidently about what they are doing and need to do in the future, and to get themselves ready to move forward with finishing out the app over there summer time.

 

Across both semesters we work with them to do journaling and documenting their code or other thinking in various ways. We help them collect photos of themselves in practice and we help them to collect artifacts of their brainstorming and other creative activity. The portfolio they produce at the end of the first year of the program shows a holistic process where they’ve engaged in the social, technical, cultural and creative acts of creating an application that is designed to be successful. As we move toward year two we envision the year to be one of putting their learning into practice with a different project and working to develop applications for other people or projects as they continue to develop the portfolio.

 

Each student is eligible at the end of year one to apply for a World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) scholarship, to apply for the World Wide Developer Academy in Naples Italy, or to take the exam to gain a credential been certified in Swift. Additionally, each of the students who complete the year will receive a micro credential granted by the University, and a line in My Spartan Story (the University level co-curricular record).

Scott Schopieray

Birth of a framework

1 min read

"Don't Let Perfect Be the Enemy of the Good

Developing a process framework for doing just about anything is sometimes a daunting task, especially since the first step for many of us when we are asked to develop one is to hit up google, which yields somewhere in the neighborhood of 350M results. In my experience, this adds to the overwhelming nature of the request and yields a response of requesting time to think and work on it, pushing deadlines out further than what are ideal. Time is necessary to do a complete process framework, of course, but many frameworks are born out of a quick look at current procedure and documenting those, then returning to the pieces and detailing them.

Process frameworks contain the following elements - they are 

CAL a11y process overview

In the above example, we documented an existing set of procedures into the beginnings of a framework in about 5 minutes.

 

In writing this I found Leveraging Process Frameworks to Simplify Process Management by Jeff Varney to be quite helpful.

https://it.toolbox.com/blogs/craigborysowich/systems-design-principles-of-hierarchical-decomposition-083011

 

Scott Schopieray

Birth of a framework

1 min read

"Don't Let Perfect Be the Enemy of the Good

Developing a process framework for doing just about anything is sometimes a daunting task, especially since the first step for many of us when we are asked to develop one is to hit up google, which yields somewhere in the neighborhood of 350M results. In my experience, this adds to the overwhelming nature of the request and yields a response of requesting time to think and work on it, pushing deadlines out further than what are ideal. Time is necessary to do a complete process framework, of course, but many frameworks are born out of a quick look at current procedure and documenting those, then returning to the pieces and 

CAL a11y process overview

In the above example, we documented an existing set of procedures into the beginnings of a framework in about 5 minutes

 

In writing this I found Leveraging Process Frameworks to Simplify Process Management by Jeff Varney to be quite helpful.

https://it.toolbox.com/blogs/craigborysowich/systems-design-principles-of-hierarchical-decomposition-083011

 

Scott Schopieray

Bill's research video link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz9Yf15DIIk

Scott Schopieray

AAN Panel on Learning Assessment

3 min read

On Friday 2/16 I was part of a panel sponsored by the Academic Advancement Network on Learning Assessment. Fellow panelists Stephen Thomas, Justin Bruner, Becky Matz and I were asked the following questions with conversation among us and the group following.

The word “assessment” means different things to different people and roles. What does learning assessment mean to you?

For me assessment is about understanding what the student has learned, or how they’ve moved the needle so to speak in terms of advancing their thinking or understanding of an issue. In our work with credentialing we really need to understand how the student is making connections of these kind of seemingly disparate events or activities that they’re doing in order to show that the sum is greater than the parts.

How do you talk to people you work with about assessment? At the college or program level, how does that translate into helping faculty and colleagues understand what you’re trying to achieve or assess?

We really start by talking about goals and objectives and understanding what it really is that we want to know. You can’t assess anything unless you know what you want to assess and too often when we start thinking about assessment we haven’t considered what our initial goals were and so we have no real way to assess.

Stephen’s comment about classroom assessment and program assessment was a really good point, one that shows that we often think about assessment as on a programmatic level and mostly with a negative connotation. Michael Lockett pointed out as well that in post-secondary education we often conflate assessment and evaluation, and that if we were to think about it in a way like K12 or other areas where evaluation happens by combining numerous assessments.

How do you see technology impacting your assessment practices? What does that mean for you?

As always, technology should be used in support of the work that we are doing or as a lever to make things easier or more efficient. Sometimes it can make things more effective, but all too often the assumption is that the technology makes things more effective without some real planning about it.

For me the technology is allowing me to better show the goals and objectives that we’ve set out for the students ahead of time so so they are wandering around in a “fog”. The achievement system that I’ve been working with Nate Lounds and others has been a great way of showing how the technology can help the students to understand where they are in a program so that they can best participate and choose ways to participate.

How do you see assessment impacting teaching and learning practices in the classroom? Do you see an impact?

When we are better able to assess learning accurately, we are better able to make adjustments to our teaching practices that will ideally yield better learning. When we can understand what students are learning better, we can best scaffold and teach more or present more learning opportunity for the students and help them figure out how to support their own learning. This is really where I see and advantage for us if we’re thinking about these things early on in a student’s career so they aren’t spending the majority of their student career here not really understanding why, what and how they need could be learning things.

Scott Schopieray

V+R Map 2018

Scott Schopieray

CPIL Academy

1 min read

Pile of legosToday marks the start of morphing the CAL Research and Digital Presence Symposium that we’ve been offering for several years into the CPIL Academy, an umbrella for all of our work we are doing around paths to leadership, digital presence, public scholarship, research strategies, collaborative work and project management (among others). 

This post outlines some of the components we are working through as a part of the academy. We take a sort of bricolage approach to this work, with a number of the components that can be swapped into and out of the work.

Pathways to Intellectual Leadership

This is the stepping stones, milestones and horizon events

Digital Presence: Online Profiles

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Digital Presence: Domains

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Creating a fundable idea/strategy

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Working as a collaborative team

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Project Management

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photo courtesy of justgrimes on flickr

Scott Schopieray

Cognitive disabilities and teaching/learning

1 min read

Some thoughts from the accessible learning conference and conversations around the conference. 

Concern for people with cognitive disabilities not being able to use their phones, etc as well because people may not have allowed them to use their phones etc in the way that normal students

Ux issues - how does ux focus on udl and helping folks with cognitive disabilities

Dignity of risk

D2L is what students are prepared to use but when someone uses other it can be distracting, confusing or otherwise have negative impact on the learner.

VR worlds - can they help us get feeback from students on built environments? For example, when we are desigining a new learning space can we do a virtual space that we then are able to use to see how people react to it/what feedback we might get?